5 Favorite Books I Read This Year

5 Favorite Books I Read This Year

 

I am a bookworm. There’s no question there. When I was a kid, my library had to impose a limit on how many books I could take out at once (that limit was 12, by the way). I go up and down on how much I can read. My attention span is not always great. But when I do, I’m a huge library fiend (even though I make my wife check out my books because the mean librarian SHHHHHHed me once.) I also love the Goodreads app. It lets me maintain a To Read list, to see reviews from other readers, enter reading challenges to challenge me. I even won a book in a giveaway once! Books to me are more important than just entertainment. They let me connect with characters, who are often easier to understand than real people. They let me learn social skills by watching people do the right thing…or the wrong thing. I have also learned that while I love reading dialogue, I hate writing it. Anyway, not all of these books are going on my all-time favorites list (that’s for another week), but they all meant something to me.

Hawkeye 1-5: If the only thing you know about Clint Barton is that he’s an Avenger and he shoots arrows, then you are missing out. The Hawkeye comics right now are phenomenal, and are so relatable to me, as someone with multiple disabilities. Canonically, Hawkeye is deaf. It depends on the issue and the author HOW deaf he is, but he is written as Hard of Hearing at the least. And even better, his disability is written well. They include Lip Reading and ASL, in fact, there’s a whole book that almost entirely in Sign Language. Pro Tip, libraries often have collections of comics, so you don’t have to shell out the cash at your friendly local comic book store (unless you want to!)

Challenger Deep: This book started out…weird. You’re drawn into something, but you have no idea what it is. It’s like you’re invested before you know what you’re invested in. It slowly gets less confusing, and the dual stories start to intertwine, and to be honest, you’re still not sure where it’s going, but you know you’re going too. In only a minor spoiler, I’m going to say that this book has a unique way of exploring mental illness. I appreciated the honesty, and how relatable it was. I also really like that it was done by a father and his son who experiences mental illness. I may want to read this again, to see if understanding the beginning better will give me a different experience than the first time. As if I don’t have enough to read.

Little Brother: This is a young adult book and when I finished it, I immediately felt like if this book had been around when I was a teenager, it would have affected me in a way that could have changed me. It’s set maybe 5 years into our future, the only real difference between our world and theirs is that their technology is slightly more advanced. Which is where the trouble lies. After a terrorist attack on San Francisco, the government starts cracking down on the population, in a totally big brother sort of way. Secret prisons, electronic monitoring, a police state, and a bunch of high schoolers just trying to make the world better. This book is about 10 years old now, but with things like Net Neutrality going on, it incredibly relevant.

The Girl with All the Gifts: Ok. So. I am not really a zombie fan. Also, zombies tend to give my wife nightmares, so we mostly avoid them. The Girl with All the Gifts is not your average zombie story. In fact, you don’t learn about it for the first quarter of the book. Basically they made it so interesting to me that once I learned there were zombies, I was already too invested. They take a very scientific approach to this genre. I actually really like learning about the sorts of bacteria, viruses, and fungi that could possibly push the brain into a zombie state. The book was also made into a movie recently with Glenn Close. I haven’t seen it yet, but it got pretty decent reviews.

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic: This is a graphic novel written by Alison Bechdel, a lesbian author whose last name you may recognize from the famous ‘Bechdel Test’ which examines feminism in media. The novel is biographical, following a young Alison from growing up in a home with distant parents, to discovering her sexuality in college, to dealing with the death of a parent. The whole thing was very straightforward, but when I finished it I felt connected to the author’s experiences. And that’s not really something that happens to me often, so here it is, on my list.

I have 10 books left to go in my reading challenge for this year, so if you have any recommendations, I’ll take them! The great think about living in a city with such a wide library system is that I can get my hands on just about anything!

 

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