Executive Dysfunction: Theme Weeks

Once upon a time, nine months ago, when my little blog was littler and newer, I put up a page called Theme Week Outlines. At the time, I was transitioning out of an Eating Disorder Intensive Outpatient Program, which kept me busy 3 hours a day, 4 days a week. I don’t do well with transitions in general, and especially ones that leave me with a sudden lack of structure. So my team and I started brainstorming ways that I could keep some semblance of structure while I moved to outpatient care. We discussed volunteering, which at that time wasn’t really doable, seeing that I wasn’t handling new situations very well at the time. We tried to plan out a very structured hour by hour schedule, sort of like what I was used to in Residential care, but it didn’t really work well with my home life. Finally, we hit on something that worked. The idea of giving each week a Theme.

And so Theme Weeks were born. After assigned the theme, I had the very enjoyable challenge of finding four activities that fit within in. An outing (which forced me to leave the house), a food (which challenged me to cook, and to try to things), a craft (which was just plain enjoyable, honestly) , and a sensory project (which can really hard, once you get past slimes and doughs and water beads. Also, most sensory tutorials out there are aimed at toddlers).

It was a little rough at the beginning. I over-planned. I overestimated my abilities. I picked recipes that were too hard, or ones that were impossible to succeed at. Remind me to tell you about my Vampire Teeth cookie debacle some time. I did eventually get into a good flow.

Very cool Theme Weeks have included Inside Out Week, Weather Week, Lego Week, Batman Week, and Knitting Week. Batman and Weather Weeks produced some very cool art, during Inside out and Knitting week we had very cool Cake Ball based recipes, and during Lego Week I put together an awesome AT-AT that now lives on my desk.

What makes Theme Weeks work for me is kind of threefold. I’ve come to find the planning really enjoyable, even if it’s turned me into a Pinterest fiend. Interestingly my Theme Weeks board gets a lot of hits! It gives me structure to my week, without forcing me to plan out every single thing that I do. So some structure, but not too much structure. It’s a delicate balance for me. Lastly, I get to spend time with my wife (because she likes these activities as much as I do) and I get to produce things that I’m proud of! Sometimes being unemployed can eat at your self esteem, but when I successfully make art that can hang on our walls, food I can share with friends, and crafts that fulfill my sensory needs, it makes me feel really good.

I would highly suggest some version of theme weeks for Executive Dysfunction. Having a small pool of activities to choose from means that I’m a lot more likely to be able to pick one. Also, after a few successful weeks, getting myself to get started on an activity is a lot easier, because I know I’ll feel good after doing it. I’ve also found that after using the Theme Weeks as training wheels for planning, I’ve been able to expand my new skills to be more successful at trying non Theme Week situations.

So give it a try! The Theme Week page is up at the top, with some descriptions, along with a PDF of the planning page I use. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me, and if you end up with any interesting Themes or Activities, I’d leave to hear!

P.S. Is it just me, or does Theme Week not look like words anymore?

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