6 Word Story pt. 25

So I didn’t do a 6 Word Story roundup last week. In my defense, most of the stories would have gone something like ‘ouch, pain, naptime, where’s my ice?’, and that’s not exciting for anyone. What is exciting (at least for me!) is that I’m feeling a lot better. On Thursday, I didn’t use my cane for a whole day, which is a big deal considering I’ve been using it for almost 7 months. Fingers crossed, but it looks like this is one medical problem that will resolve itself!

No more surgeries as far as I know, so stay tuned for business as usual!

 

  • Post surgery tradition is a stuffie.
  • Self, platonic, and romantic are all love.
  • Nothing distracts me from the pain.
  • Nap like you don’t even care.
  • Rain rain go away. No. Seriously.
  • Smelling books is a sensory experience.
  • Today I walked without my cane!!!

 

6 Word Stories pt.22

This week has been wracked with anxiety, and I’m trying to weather the storm. It’s made writing more difficult, as I’ve lost every bit of confidence that I have, so even if I can start something, I find myself deleting it immediately because to me, it all reads like crap. I’m trying to change up my strategy a bit, writing more from that heart, about experiences I’m having as they come. We’ll see how that goes. Other news is that I had my first infusion using my port. The whole thing went pear shaped and I ended up having a meltdown at the infusion center, but I’m hoping things will get easier. On the bright side, my stitches have healed, and the port has stopped hurting, although it does itch like crazy. I’m thinking that will go away soon too.

 

  • Why am I in the kitchen?
  • Knit purl, knit purl, soothing stitches.
  • Important Announcement: New Special Interest Acquired!
  • Too many books- not a problem.
  • Dear strangers: please don’t touch me.
  • I’ve decided that bras aren’t necessary.
  • Can’t handle this friendship falling apart.

Hope everyone is having a good week, and I hope it’s as warm wherever you are as it is here!

6 Word Stories pt. 15

Happy belated Thanksgiving! I hope you all had happy social interactions and sensory friendly food. Since all of our family is back east (and because Jess works on Thanksgiving), it’s just the two of us. I love doing dinner this way, because we make all the foods that we love, and I don’t have to worry about not having food I like, and Jess doesn’t have to worry about accidentally getting gluten-ed. We had a great time over the long weekend, lots of good food, reading good books, and playing board games. We also took a nice walk around town for Small Business Saturday. Supporting local businesses by buying chocolate is definitely my sort of thing! I also got a lot of writing done, which is good, because while I’m not doing a word count for NaNoWriMo, I’m still making an effort to write as much as possible.

  • Hoping new toothbrush will help hygiene.
  • Binder helps dysphoria- is sensory hell.
  • Starting holiday shopping is so exciting!
  • Waited all year for Thanksgiving food.
  • Why leave when there’s online shopping?
  • Never thought writing would be therapeutic.
  • The library is my happy place.

Well, here’s been my week in 42 words! I hope you all have a nice week- maybe getting a chance to go to you happy place. If you don’t have one, I suggest trying the library. It’s quiet and there’s books!

7 Favorite Childhood Books

I have been an intense reader my whole life, starting when I surprised the pants off my parents by reading my favorite book to myself when I was three. Now, they weren’t as surprised as they could have been, because I’d started memorizing books a few months before that, and it took them a while to realizing that I was actually reading. And since toddlerhood, my love for books has only gotten stronger. When I was in elementary school, the library put a book limit on my card because I was determined to read the entire children’s section, and would take out dozens of books at a time. The past few years I haven’t had the brain power to do much reading, but this year, to my immense pleasure, I’m back on track! I’ve had a great book year, I even hit my book goal on Goodreads last week. So in sort a celebration of that, here are some of my favorite books from childhood, I can highly recommend all of them!

1. Matilda: I feel like Roald Dahl’s books are universally loved among children. Even if they haven’t read any of his books, name me a kid who hasn’t seen Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory? Matilda was my favorite because I hardcore identified with her. I wasn’t the sort of genius that Matilda was, but I had a 3rd grade superiority complex, and was constantly frustrated by everyone who was “stupider” than me. Thank goodness I’ve outgrown that. I also saw myself in Matilda when it came to families. In most books aimed at kids, parents are either Perfect, or Abusive and Evil. Most authors grossly underestimate a child’s ability to move beyond black and white thinking. But Matilda’s parents were 100% grey, it’s not that they were intentionally terribly; it was more that they were completely self-involved, and they simply didn’t care. I secretly wished for a happy ending like Matilda’s- to find an adult who care, one who would take care of me. Unfortunately, fiction is fiction, and life is life. It’s still a great book, I promise.

2. The Way Things Work: My Aunt and Uncle on my dad’s side always bought us educational gifts. It bugged my sister sometimes, but I never had a problem with it. I’ll read anything, cereal boxes, the backs of shampoo bottles, so for me, any book is great! When I was in 3rd grade I received a giant tome called How Things Work. It took a very engineering approach, and had what seemed like infinite pages of anything and everything you could possibly image, taken apart. I tried reading the whole thing through multiple times, but every time, I’d skip a page because I saw something cool, and I’d never get back on track. If I had been better at math, this book could have slid me into an engineering job, for sure.

3. Jacob’s Rescue: In my quest to read through the children’s section, I read some pretty boring books, but I also picked up some that would change me. I’ve written before about how my Holocaust Special Interest really affected my personality, and this book right here, is what started it all. I didn’t know how important it would be at the time, it was just the next book on my list. Let me tell you, I must have read this thing a dozen times the first time I took it out. And I kept taking it out. I’d never read anything like it before, and it started my need to know everything that happened during that time. 3rd grade me figured knowing everything was the closest I could get to helping, 55 years later.

4. The Monster at the End of this Book: This is mostly important because was one of the first books that I read regularly to myself. My sense of humor has always been a few degrees off everyone around me, but it wasn’t with this book. I don’t care how young or old you are, this book is funny. Grover is neurotic and silly at the same time, and he breaks the fourth wall, which when I was a tiny little thing, was hilarious!

5. The Phantom Tollbooth: Have you ever read a book after seeing the movie? Especially a movie that you love? For me, it really goes well. Movies give me a very visual interpretation of a story, and reading the book is a very different experience. This is one of the few exception to that. I got this movie out of the library week after week. Watching it is a really bizarre experience, it was made in the seventies, and is part live action, part animation, filled with slightly trippy musical numbers and Dali-esque scenery. The book has equally weird illustrations. I think I was ok with both interprestions because the idea of a land with words and numbers were considered important, and where the goal was Rhyme and Reason was so appealing to me that I was willing to accept any interpretation of it. This story is so important to me, that the Princesses of Rhyme and Reason are going to be my next tattoo!

6. A Little Princess: This is a classic, one that didn’t bore me at the time. If you’ve heard this story, you probably know why it was one of my favorites, just like Matilda. Adults who have no right to be taking care of children are eventually ousted by loving adults. On top of this, it’s a great riches to rags to riches story, with a strong female protagonist, and lots of adventure along the way! The book was made into a movie back in the 30s, and I loved it. And I was so excited when I found out that the movie was being remade! Unfortunately for little autistic me, there were several very loud and overwhelming battle scenes, and I eventually ended up running out of the theatre. I still haven’t seen the end of it.

7. Good Families Don’t: Let’s face it, farts are funny, and the author who wrote this book very skillfully makes sure everyone knows it. I loved it, and wanted to hear the story over and over, but for whatever reason, this wasn’t a book I ever really read to myself. I loved reading to myself, because I could go fast, and skip the boring parts and read my favorite parts over and over, but there’s something really nice about being read to. I don’t know if other early readers have had this experience, sometimes every though I could read to myself, I still liked being read to. So this book is special, mostly because it was something that I read with my parents. We’d spend time together doing something I liked and we’d laugh together. This book is good memories all around.

5 Favorite Books I Read This Year

5 Favorite Books I Read This Year

 

I am a bookworm. There’s no question there. When I was a kid, my library had to impose a limit on how many books I could take out at once (that limit was 12, by the way). I go up and down on how much I can read. My attention span is not always great. But when I do, I’m a huge library fiend (even though I make my wife check out my books because the mean librarian SHHHHHHed me once.) I also love the Goodreads app. It lets me maintain a To Read list, to see reviews from other readers, enter reading challenges to challenge me. I even won a book in a giveaway once! Books to me are more important than just entertainment. They let me connect with characters, who are often easier to understand than real people. They let me learn social skills by watching people do the right thing…or the wrong thing. I have also learned that while I love reading dialogue, I hate writing it. Anyway, not all of these books are going on my all-time favorites list (that’s for another week), but they all meant something to me.

Hawkeye 1-5: If the only thing you know about Clint Barton is that he’s an Avenger and he shoots arrows, then you are missing out. The Hawkeye comics right now are phenomenal, and are so relatable to me, as someone with multiple disabilities. Canonically, Hawkeye is deaf. It depends on the issue and the author HOW deaf he is, but he is written as Hard of Hearing at the least. And even better, his disability is written well. They include Lip Reading and ASL, in fact, there’s a whole book that almost entirely in Sign Language. Pro Tip, libraries often have collections of comics, so you don’t have to shell out the cash at your friendly local comic book store (unless you want to!)

Challenger Deep: This book started out…weird. You’re drawn into something, but you have no idea what it is. It’s like you’re invested before you know what you’re invested in. It slowly gets less confusing, and the dual stories start to intertwine, and to be honest, you’re still not sure where it’s going, but you know you’re going too. In only a minor spoiler, I’m going to say that this book has a unique way of exploring mental illness. I appreciated the honesty, and how relatable it was. I also really like that it was done by a father and his son who experiences mental illness. I may want to read this again, to see if understanding the beginning better will give me a different experience than the first time. As if I don’t have enough to read.

Little Brother: This is a young adult book and when I finished it, I immediately felt like if this book had been around when I was a teenager, it would have affected me in a way that could have changed me. It’s set maybe 5 years into our future, the only real difference between our world and theirs is that their technology is slightly more advanced. Which is where the trouble lies. After a terrorist attack on San Francisco, the government starts cracking down on the population, in a totally big brother sort of way. Secret prisons, electronic monitoring, a police state, and a bunch of high schoolers just trying to make the world better. This book is about 10 years old now, but with things like Net Neutrality going on, it incredibly relevant.

The Girl with All the Gifts: Ok. So. I am not really a zombie fan. Also, zombies tend to give my wife nightmares, so we mostly avoid them. The Girl with All the Gifts is not your average zombie story. In fact, you don’t learn about it for the first quarter of the book. Basically they made it so interesting to me that once I learned there were zombies, I was already too invested. They take a very scientific approach to this genre. I actually really like learning about the sorts of bacteria, viruses, and fungi that could possibly push the brain into a zombie state. The book was also made into a movie recently with Glenn Close. I haven’t seen it yet, but it got pretty decent reviews.

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic: This is a graphic novel written by Alison Bechdel, a lesbian author whose last name you may recognize from the famous ‘Bechdel Test’ which examines feminism in media. The novel is biographical, following a young Alison from growing up in a home with distant parents, to discovering her sexuality in college, to dealing with the death of a parent. The whole thing was very straightforward, but when I finished it I felt connected to the author’s experiences. And that’s not really something that happens to me often, so here it is, on my list.

I have 10 books left to go in my reading challenge for this year, so if you have any recommendations, I’ll take them! The great think about living in a city with such a wide library system is that I can get my hands on just about anything!