Three Wishes

I’m walking along the beach, looking for sea glass, and doing my best to ignore the grains of sand that have worked their way into my shoes. I see something in the distance, glinting in the sunlight, and I dash forward, hoping to find more glass for my collection. As I reach for my treasure, I realize that it is a fully intact bottle, not the rough and tumble fragments I’ve been searching for. Bottle in hand, I try to clean the sand off the bottle, when it disappears with a POOF.

In front of me stands what I can only describe as a Man/Moose hybrid, and when I manage to drag my eyes away from his massive antlers, I see him gazing at me, expectantly.

“Well, what will it be?”

I have no idea what he’s talking about. I figure if I don’t respond, he’ll explain himself.

“I don’t have all day here, you know.”

I’ve lost my words. It figures that a fantastically magical being would render me non-verbal. I cross my fingers that he understands ASL, and I sign DON’T-UNDERSTAND.

With a great huff and shake of his head, he says “Your wishes. You have three. Use them wisely. ” Under his breath he adds “Ugh, mortals.”

Thanks to a childhood Special Interest in mythology, I know that genies are rarely benevolent. These tricksters never have your best interest in mind, and take joy in warping wishes. I know I will have to be careful.

One thing that I never understood about wishers in stories was why they never used their first wish to make sure their remaining one were granted accurately. I tell this to the Moose Man, and his eyebrows furrow.

“You would waste a wish like that? I know you, mortal, and you have too many problems to be wishing for precision. In fact, I’ll make you a deal. You use me to wish away the demons that plague you, I give you my word that I’ll stick to the spirit of the wishes.”

Demons? Can those antlers let him see something that I can’t? Am I infested? I feel itchy just thinking about it.

Before I make any decisions, I definitely need to know what he means by “demons.” Again I sign DON’T-UNDERSTAND.

“Your brain, it is different from those of other humans. It causes you pain from your senses, confusion from social interactions, and despair from living a world that is not meant for you. I can use your wishes to take all of that away- why would you wish for anything else?”

I am stunned. Does he not realize that by taking away the bad, he would take away the good as well? Yes, I experience sensory hell, but there is sensory heaven in my world tool. The joy from my special interests outweighs the struggles I have with things like socialization and executive dysfunction. And mostly importantly, changing how my brain works would change who I am. Who would wish for that?

I have to think carefully about my wishes. They need to be so clear that he can’t warp them, and they have to benefit not only me, but everyone in my community.

He paces and glares while I take my time, but eventually, I am happy with my choices. I turn back to him and say:

“I like who I am, and would never risk changing that. Here are my wishes, and I hope they reflect that.”

  1. I wish to be included in my own Advocacy. I know myself best. I know my needs and struggles, and I need to be considered an expert in the field of myself. We will never make progress unless we give precedence to the voices of personal experience.
  2. I wish for Accessibility. Many of the problems that I experience could be easily resolved by people willing to meet me in the middle. All people with disabilities would be able to accomplish more if more of an effort were made to see weaknesses and then find solutions to balance them out. It’s possible, and more of an effort needs to be made.
  3. Lastly, I wish for Acceptance. Everyone deserves to be respected for who they are, and no matter what their abilities are. I don’t want people to make pity-eyes at me, and I don’t want people to think that the way my brain works is a tragedy. I am who I am.

He looks and me solemnly, and after a few moments replies “As you wish.”

All around me, lights swirl around me, and when I’m practically surrounded, I hear another great POOF and

I wake up in my bed. Half asleep and bleary eyed, I try to remember the Moose Man, but all I can recall is his ignorance, and his massive antlers.

90% Shameless Self Promotion

I absolutely understand if you don’t click on this. Who wants to hear someone talk about themselves day in and day out? Except maybe bloggers…

Anyway, it’s April, which is Autism Acceptance Month, and I’ve been having some fun. My Etsy store is empty 90% of the time, but as April draws closer, I start feeling the pull to get creative. And I figure, I’ve got all this stuff that I think people might enjoy, so why not?

I’ll keeping the pitch simple here. My shop is open. Everything is under $5. 10% of anything I make goes to the Autistic Self Advocacy Network. Free shipping to the continental US, and 15% off if you spend more than $5.

So. If you have any need for cute stickers, pins, or worry stones, I’m your person.

Thank you for reading this far- I’m just going to leave you with a few pictures…

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Autism is not a tragedy

special interest

autisticat body

 

Autism Acceptance Education Acrostic

It’s April again, and here we are kicking off Autism Acceptance Month! Calling it Acceptance Month instead of Awareness month may confuse people who are outside of the Neurodivergent community, but I think that this provides a great opportunity for education.

So, since I never miss a chance to make poetry here is an Acrostic poem with education in mind.

Autism Acceptance Education Acrostic

Autism is a neurological variation in functioning, not a illness, a disease, or a tragedy.

Curing Autism is not the goal of Autistic people. We want Accessibility and Acceptance.

Communities can promote inclusivity by listening to Autistic people about their needs.

Eugenics works by wiping out genes, like ones that cause Autism. No more Autistics.

Person first language is preferred by many groups. Autistics prefer Identity First.

The Neurodiversity Movement includes neurotypes like Tourette Syndrome and ADHD.

Accessibility is necessary for Neurodivergent people to succeed in their communities.

Nothing About Us Without Us is a Disability Rights slogan that promotes self advocacy.

Communication doesn’t just mean speaking, there are many ways people can connect.

Empathy may be a struggle for some Autistic folks, but that doesn’t mean they don’t care.

 

Notes:

  • Person First Language aka A person with Autism, instead of an Autistic Person, is generally recommended by Disability Advocacy groups. Most Autistics reject it because we believe that Autism is an intrinsic part of who we are. The Deaf Community also for the most part rejects Person First Language.
  • Other Autistic Cousins include Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, and Epilepsy.
  • Accessibility can include assistive devices (noise canceling headphones, stim toys, etc.), support people/animals, things like using email instead of phones, and having family/friends/coworkers learn about Autism.
  • The Autism Rights Movement borrowed “Nothing About Us Without Us” from Disability Rights, and have used the goal of Self Advocacy to found organizations like the Autism Self Advocacy Network (ASAN).
  • Other ways to communicate include Sign Language and Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices. Also, communication styles are as unique as the people who use them, so use what makes the most sense.

*please note, that I only speak for myself. Every Neurodivergent person has differing opinions, and when in doubt, trust the individual.